GOOD INTENTIONS, IMPERFECT EXECUTION?

WOMEN GET FEWER OF THE “HOT JOBS” NEEDED TO ADVANCE

HOW DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION DETERMINE WHO GETS THE “HOT JOBS” THAT COULD CHANGE THE COURSE OF SOMEONE’S CAREER?

“HOT JOBS” GET HIGH POTENTIALS AHEAD

Highly visible projects, mission-critical roles, and international experiences are hallmarks of “hot jobs.” They predict advancement, yet our ndings show that women get fewer of these hot jobs than men.

Given the strategic importance of shaping tomorrow’s leaders, most global companies have embraced the business case for gender diversity, and virtually all have established formal leadership development courses, high-potential programs, succession-planning practices, formal mentoring, multi-rater feedback mechanisms, and skills training. Despite these e orts, women remain underrepresented at senior levels, indicating that these programs may not be paying off equally for women and men. And past Catalyst research shows there is typically little accountability in place to ensure women’s equal access to development opportunities.

Is imperfect execution of leadership development experiences behind the persistent gender gap5 in leadership?

In this report we turn our attention to the development opportunities that launch careers ahead. For companies striving to close persistent gender gaps, allocating critical assignments—those highly visible projects, mission-critical roles, and international experiences—to high-potential women in more intentional and strategic ways can make a dramatic di erence.

Read the Report

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